Wednesday, September 7, 2005

Apple #106: Request Lines Are Open

I've done this before, and it worked pretty well, so I'm doing it again. If any of you readers out there are curious about a particular subject, some little fact you've always wanted to know what the heck that was about, post a comment here in this entry and let me know. I, your Apple Lady, will do my darnedest to find the answer. And maybe I'll find a helpful picture or two.

I know for a fact that two or three of you regular readers have been storing up requests. You know who you are. I say to you, fear not! Request away!

You can post comments anonymously, so you don't have to worry about having a blog or not having a blog or any of that crap if you want to submit a request. Just click on the comments link at the bottom of this entry.

I'll keep taking requests for a while. I don't know for how long, depends on how many requests people submit and over what time period. I'll let you know when I get to feeling like the time for submitting questions is almost up.

And please, since everybody in the family eats apples, keep your questions suitable for all readers.

Thanks in advance for helping me expand this beyond my own imagination.

--The Apple Lady

12 comments:

  1. Dear Apple Lady,

    I finally remembered my idea. I want to know about the origin of the phrase "the rabbit died" (or "the rabbit DONE died," according to Aerosmith). I know it's got something to do with old-time pregnancy tests, but what's the connection?

    Jim F.

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  2. Tonsils, please.

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  3. i would like to see where the myth of storks delivering babies came from

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  4. Sally Ride, si vous plait.

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  5. Dear Apple Lady,

    I'm from Indiana, and though I'm technically a Hoosier, I have no idea what this word means. Where did the word originate? How did it come to be part of the Indiana lexicon? Everyone I know from Indiana has their own story/legend, but no one can seem to agree: what in the heck is a Hoosier?

    Felix J, Chicago

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  6. Dear Apple Lady:

    "All Along the Watchtower"...

    How many people have recorded it? And why did anyone bother doing so after Hendrix made it his? :D

    R to the O to the C to the K.

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  7. Would you mind indulging another Chicagoan's request?

    I pass over the Chicago River every day on my way to work and flirt with the idea of doing a sweeping swan dive off the Wells Street bridge. My questions:

    Will I get fined or jailed for doing the dive? And if I do manage to make the leap, what's the likelihood of me getting sick from being immersed in the river?

    Chris and his boyish curiousity want to know.

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  8. Two words: Mr. T

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  9. Fork Stealer9/22/2005 3:03 AM

    Sorry I'm so late to the party:

    I was wondering, if you have the inclination, if you could focus your considerable research powers on the origins of the term "welsh" as in "to welsh on a deal," and why it is also sometimes "welch" (which is what I always thought it was, which is why I am writing you). I read an article that used "welsh" and that prompted me to Google, which turned up a few discussions but no answers as to why some people use one and some people use the other.

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  10. I don't know if this an unappropriate subject or not, but my wife would like to know why a woman's cycle will change when with different groups of women. Perhaps there's really no explanation for this.

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  11. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  12. I removed a request for information about a particular topic that was not in keeping with the spirit of this blog. I haven't mentioned this in a while, but I intend to keep this blog suitable for readers of all backgrounds. Which means that insults directed at any group of people are not acceptable on these pages.

    --The Apple Lady

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If you're a spammer, there's no point posting a comment. It will automatically get filtered out or deleted. Comments from real people, however, are always very welcome!